We rely on the groundhog to predict an early spring or more winter every February. After doing some research, I found out that it's not just the groundhogs that have snow-predicting skills. Nature has a lot of different ways to help us prepare us for the different seasons.

Groundhog Day
Columbia Pictures
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Woolly Bear Worms

Of course, we have to start with our woolly friends. Some people will call them caterpillars, but we will stick to woolly worms. Most scientists will say that the woolly bear worm study wasn't done on a large enough scale to have real meaning.

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But according to the Farmers' Almanac"If the rusty band is wide, then it will be a mild winter. The more black there is, the more severe the winter. Note that white, yellow, or other colors of fuzzy caterpillars are NOT the same type of woolly worm and are not used for weather forecasting."

Heidi Hyndman
Heidi Hyndman
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 Tough Skin = Harsh Winter

This weather-predicting tip from nature comes from fruits and veggies. If you are finding it difficult to shuck corn, bite into an apple or cut an onion, we could be in for a harsh winter. Sidenote, I'd rather be stuck in a blizzard than cut into an onion!

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Sticks Can Predict Weather

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Web of Winter

I really don't see a lot of actual spiderwebs. The spiders around our house seem to just fall from one little string. But, if you see a spider spinning a really large web in the fall, you can expect that frost is on the way and a very cold winter.

canva
canva
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KEEP READING: Get answers to 51 of the most frequently asked weather questions...

Stock Up on These Winter Essentials Before It Snows

Winter is coming! Before you get caught with three feet of snow and no snowsuit, make sure that you have the essentials to get thru this winter and stay warm!
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