A restoration project for the ages is taking place in Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Indiana Landmarks is searching for an interested party to sign a 50-year lease for The House of Tomorrow as repairs are underway to preserve the history of this unique structure.

User:M on Wikipedia Beverly Shores by ɱ/ CC BY-SA 4.0 (No Changes Made)
User:M on Wikipedia
Beverly Shores by ɱ/ CC BY-SA 4.0 (No Changes Made)
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Century of Progress

Indiana Landmarks is teaming up with Indiana Dunes National Park to invite all interested parties to submit proposals for a long-term lease to insure the continuity of this historical Indiana landmark home near Beverly Shores.

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Why is This an Important Project?

The House of Tomorrow was once featured in the 1933-34 Worlds Fair in Chicago, Illinois. This historic, modern abode was blueprinted and designed by architect George Fred Keck and has been noted as one of the most innovative homes during its Worlds Fair tenure. This home was one of the first ever built, with glass window-curtain walls, predating many other noted glass-walled structures.

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50 Year Lease

To ensure the preservation of the Century of Progress homes, in situations similar to this one, the properties can be subleased in exchange for the long-term lease agreement needed for the restoration and preservation of the property.  

How Much Will It Cost?

Four out of the five "Homes of Tomorrow" have been restored under similar arrangements. While the homes are a bit of a modern marvel, their age and complex architecture present a bit of a challenge for anyone looking to undertake and help oversee any restoration efforts. It's predicted that the costs of the preservation efforts could cost anywhere from $2.5 to upwards of $3 million. 

Indiana Landmarks in collaboration with The National Trust have sought out great resources as far as their restoration team is concerned. According to Todd Zeiger, the Director of the South Bend office of Indiana Landmarks, they are currently working on the exterior of the home and will be looking for a long-term lease so that they can get started on the interior. A team of architects and engineers are on standby to return the 1933 Keck-designed home to its glory days, while simultaneously rocketing it towards the future, to make the home inhabitable for generations to come. 

For more information on the restoration project, please visit the Indiana Landmarks website, while there considering putting in a bid to restore a bit of history. 

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