This is my front yard.  And, yes, those are freaking leaves.

It's just the end of August and my leaves are already falling off my trees.  And look at 'em! They're already brown.  Ummm, hello!  Summer's not over yet so what is the deal?  I mean, I realize it's been incredibly hot and humid.  Have my leaves just been burned to a crisp?  Is that why a bunch of them have already shriveled up and plummeted to the ground?  Have we had a shortage of Chlorophyll?

This is insane!  Trust me, I would rather have my privates gnawed off by piranha than to have to rake my leaves.  I am not mentally (or physically) prepared to get the rake out of the garage yet.  This just doesn't seem normal to me.

Because it doesn't seem normal to me, I did a little Google-searching to see when leaves in Kentucky typically turn colors.  Guess what?  As expected, IT'S IN THE FALL!!!!!  According to a variety of online sources, the peak season for Kentucky's beautiful Fall foliage is late October/early November and leaves typically don't even start changing colors until mid-September.

Also, random note.  Did you know that Kentucky has a "ColorFall" Hotline?  I'm not making it up.  The number is 800-225-8747.  I called it Wednesday afternoon.  It's actually the number for the Tourism Arts and Heritage Cabinet, but, according to a Fall foliage piece on VisitLex.com, "You can find out about the progression of changing leaves across Kentucky, late September through early November," by calling it.

Again, though, I need to reiterate- "late September through early November."  I should also point out that, according to Kentucky Tourism, that color changes in September are typically in the higher elevations of the mountains in the eastern side of the state.  I live on the west side of Owensboro.  There's not a mountain!  Anywhere.

Oh, if you want to read more about Kentucky's Fall Colors, you can check out the Kentucky Tourism site. Or, if you want to get a jump start on Fall foliage, you can just drive my house and look at my yard.  If you do, bring a rake and some trash bags.

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