I have been on the struggle bus for about a week now with sinus issues of horrible drainage and a sore, hoarse throat.  The “Ohio Valley Crud” as it’s commonly known plagues us all this time of year in some form or fashion.

I have heard that local honey helps minimize the effects allergies can have on a person’s respiratory system.  I’ve been taking advantage of the benefits of a cup of hot tea for my sore throat, so I thought it wouldn’t hurt to use honey as a sweetener.

Photo by Shreevardhan Iyer on Unsplash
Photo by Shreevardhan Iyer on Unsplash
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After a few days, my voice is still hoarse, but I have noticed the pressure behind my ears is gone and the gross snot has dwindled to a still annoying yet manageable amount. Is this due to the honey or has the sinus infection just run its course? I decided to do some reading to find out!

Photo by Bianca Ackermann on Unsplash
Photo by Bianca Ackermann on Unsplash
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Support for Local Honey:

Is there truth to the claim that local honey can help reduce the symptoms of allergies? The Farmer’s Almanac says that this naturally produced bee product has a component that can promote restful sleep, soothe an irritated throat, and reduce inflammation.  The idea is that bees make honey from pollen collected from flowers which makes its way into the sweet nectar formed in the comb. The standard for making the honey “local” is that it is made anywhere within a 50-mile radius of where you live. This way you can guarantee the pollen used to make the honey is from plants you encounter and may be reacting to.

Photo by David Clode on Unsplash
Photo by David Clode on Unsplash
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Debunking Claims About Local Honey

On the other hand, as of last year, The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America wasn’t quite convinced. They make the point that bees tend to gravitate toward bright pretty flowers while most seasonal allergy problems are caused by grass, trees, and weeds. So the pollen in the honey wouldn’t be from the worst culprits, therefore, debunking the “desensitizing” aspect of consuming local honey.

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Photo by Bermix Studio on Unsplash
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Studies Performed About Local Honey Effectiveness

Studies have been performed that provide support for both sides of this issue, so it really is up in the air as to whether this natural remedy is legit or an old wives’ tale.  I can speak from my own anecdotal experience when I say the difference honey makes for my sore throat is enough for me to continue to use it when I am sick.  Even if it is just a placebo effect, it works for me! Plus, just like everything else grown or made locally, it is next-level delicious!

Photo by Amelia Bartlett on Unsplash
Photo by Amelia Bartlett on Unsplash
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Where to Find Local Honey

I purchase mine from Niko’s Bakery because it is in my neck of the woods, but here is a list of other locations in the area that sell or produce local honey:

  • Reid’s Orchard
  • Cecil Farms
  • Hillview Farms
  • The Cottage
  • Owensboro Regional Farmer’s Market
  • Gene’s Health Food
  • Trunnell’s Farm Market

 

Do you know of any other local beekeepers to add to the list? Share with us on WBKR.com, the WBKR App or WBKR Facebook page!

 

KEEP READING: See 25 natural ways to boost your immune system

 

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