Indiana has ushered in a wave of legal changes in 2023, bringing significant alterations to various aspects of daily life. From long-standing restrictions to modern concerns, these new laws promise to reshape the state's legal landscape. Here are the key updates you should be aware of:

Throwing Stars: A Shift in Classification

Photo canva throwing star
Photo canva throwing star
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Throwing stars, once prohibited in Indiana since the mid-1980s, have undergone a reclassification under Senate Bill 77. Now categorized as knife weapons, these tools enjoy a mostly legal status. However, they remain off-limits on school premises, including school buses, ensuring safety within educational environments.

Privacy and Electronic Surveillance

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Photo: canva spy
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Individuals who electronically track others without their consent will be held accountable for a misdemeanor. This regulation becomes a felony if the individual possesses an unrelated conviction for domestic violence, stalking, or invasion of privacy. Senate Bill 161 retains allowances for electronic tracking among family members, except in cases involving restraining orders.

Improved Compensation for Jurors

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Photo: canva jury
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Indiana has taken strides to address a longstanding issue: juror compensation. House Bill 1466 has effectively doubled the compensation for jurors, elevating them to one of the best-paid in the nation. Jurors now earn $80 per day, which increases to $90 after the sixth day of a trial. The state's commitment to pay jurors $30 for each day they are impaneled, even when not actively in court, marks a significant improvement in juror welfare.

Read More: New Indiana Laws Effective July 1, 2023: What You Need to Know

Defining Boundaries for Public and Police Interactions:

Photo: canva police bubble
Photo: canva police bubble
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House Bill 1186 establishes a 25-foot protective zone around on-duty police officers, aiming to maintain a safe working environment for law enforcement officials and the public alike. Crossing this boundary after being instructed to stop could result in penalties including up to 60 days of imprisonment and a $500 fine. Supporters contend that this legislation safeguards both officers and civilians, while critics express concerns that it could impede citizens' ability to record police actions.

Source:[IN.GOV]

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