'You can't complain if you don't vote.' But can I complain about some of the city boundaries that exclude me from voting?

I call myself a proud resident of the city of Evansville, Indiana. But, according to the voting map, I'm technically a resident of Vanderburgh County, barely. I live on a fairly short street, and part of my neighbors are within the Evansville city limits, and the rest of us are cut off. I doubled checked this map just to make sure that I couldn't vote in the Indiana Primary Election.

The area covered in the peach color is in Vanderburgh County. Notice the odd chunk that is the city around knob Hill.

voting district Evansville
voting district Evansville
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Who Can Change This Map?

I honestly don't know the answer to that question. Maybe the County Commissioners or the Mayor? This really just becomes an issue for me and anyone else living on the fringe of the city lines when we elect a new Mayor. I am genuinely interested in our government, but it's a bummer to have zero say in who leads the city. Again, I live barely into the county, and some of my neighbors are able to vote in the city elections. They even had political signs in their yards, which led me to check into this further.

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According to Indiana Code § 3-8-1-23, to be eligible to run for Mayor, a person must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States
  • Be at least 18 years old by the time of the general election
  • Have been a resident of the city or town for at least one year prior to the general election
  • Not have been convicted of a felony

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