At the risk of sounding like a broken record, 2020 has been tough on everyone. The COVID-19 pandemic, the protests, the election, it seems like it's just one thing after another, after another, after another. People have lost their jobs, businesses are struggling, and stress levels are through the roof. As an adult, trying to make sense of it all can be unnerving. But what about for kids? The Children's Museum of Evansville found in the Tri-State willing to share how they feel about the way the year has played out so far, along with what they think needs to happen moving forward.

It's easy as a parent/adult to not put much stock in what a kid thinks. I think there's a feeling they're too young to understand what's going on, that a particular situation isn't as simple as they may make it out to be, or that they don't have the life experience yet to even have the right to an opinion. Maybe there are some of us who feel like since we put food on the table for them to eat and a roof over their head, they need to just keep quiet, play on their phones, and do their homework. I know I'm certainly guilty of it sometimes with my 16 and 14 year old. But the truth is, they are seeing what's happening in the world, and they do have thoughts on it. All of it. Just like you and me, they're concerned about what they see playing out on TV and online. They have their own worries about those things, and we need to listen.

Normally, the Children's Museum of Evansville (cMoe) would give kids the chance to share their opinions in person during their annual Children's March through downtown Evansville. But, because COVID-19 is still very much a thing in the area, unfortunately with no sign of slowing down anytime soon, they had no choice but to cancel for safety reasons. Instead, they gave a few the opportunity to share their observations and concerns through the video above that is certainly worth the five minutes or so minutes of your time to watch. Hopefully, it inspires you to sit down with your kids and talk about what they're seeing, and how they feel about it.

[Source: Children's Museum of Evansville via YouTube]

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