I've always said, when it comes to driving, I'm good with how I'm doing, but I don't know what someone ELSE is going to do.

That's why it still flies all over me when I look over and notice another driver with their phone up in their face or their head tilted down for an extended period of time, clearly looking at their phone.

I had a driver get right on my bumper the other day, so I moved into the left lane to give them the road once the light turned green. Never once did the motorist take her eyes off her phone during the stop or as she drove through it once she could. It was on top of her steering wheel.

But, by all means, do NOT read that sentence and think I'm saying something about women drivers. I'm not. And, actually, if I WERE, I wouldn't have a leg to stand on. I'll explain later.

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I've discovered a website called Zutobi. It's a DMV site devoted to helping folks prepare for drivers' tests. It provides sample testing and, really, shows you everything you'll encounter once you go for your permit and then your license.

But wait, there's more. It also, naturally, surveys crash data and determines what states have the safest drivers.

And if that type of information factors into your vacation plans, you'll want to STEER CLEAR of Wyoming. I was surprised by this one, considering it is the nation's least populated state but among the top ten in geographic size. So much space and so few people and yet the Cowboy State records 55 fatal accidents per 100,000 people per year. Of course, 80mph IS the speed limit on Wyoming's interstate highways. I'm no expert, but it feels like that MIGHT have something to do with it.

So...where do Kentucky and Indiana rank? Well, the Bluegrass State is 13 spots higher than Indiana. But this time, the higher ranking is nothing to be proud of. Kentucky, sitting at a ROBUST number nine, has 36.1 traffic fatalities per year, per 100,000 citizens, with more than 1,600 involved in those crashes.

Indiana comes in 22nd. There are 26.1 accidents per 100,000 in the Hoosier State per year, with more than 1,700 people involved in those fatal crashes.

And, by the way, to my earlier point...Zutobi's study reveals that MEN are involved in more accidents than women. In case you were wondering.

So let's all buckle up, put our phones down, and make sure our eyes are looking in the only direction they need to be looking...through our windshields.

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