Since the global pandemic began in early 2020, we have watched as the whole world came to a grinding halt, and then the vaccines began to roll out with many, but not all, getting vaccinated against Covid-19.

We started seeing businesses begin opening back up, live music and events made a return and people started traveling again. Unfortunately, now the Covid-19 numbers are once again starting to soar, particularly in regards to the Delta variant and it has caused a lot of businesses and events to require proof of vaccination. Bands and artists can now require proof of vaccination (or proof of negative Covid-19 test results) before you can gain entry to venues or shows.

If you've been vaccinated, you likely received a small piece of paper that was marked with detailed information regarding your vaccination - the date of the doses, the manufacturer of the vaccine you received, the lot number of the particular dose you received, etc. This tiny piece of paper, which could easily be lost, damaged, or soiled is supposed to be your certified proof that you received your vaccination. Some people laminated theirs, but that may not be the best idea since there is a possibility of needing to add more information to the certificate at a later date, especially if a booster vaccine becomes necessary due to the variants that are evolving. So how can you carry your vaccination certificate while also keeping it safe?

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If you were vaccinated in the state of Indiana, it is relatively simple to get a digital copy of your vaccination certification, making it easy to carry your certification with you anywhere you go on your smartphone using the Indiana Vaccination Portal. The electronic portal, hosted by the Indiana State Department of Health, is easily accessible with some basic personal information including your first and last name, gender, date of birth, and zip code. Once you fill out the requested information and complete the security step by entering the code shown on the screen, you'll need to check the box stating that you are "authorized to access this COVID-19 vaccination information as either the patient or parent or guardian of the patient."

Once you click submit, you'll be taken to a new page that will show you your Covid-19 vaccination record, including all of the information found on the paper certification you were given after you received your vaccine. At the bottom of the page is where you'll find the link to "Download Vaccination Certificate." Once you click that link, the download will be initiated and you'll have a digital copy of your vaccination certification that you can keep on you at all times without the risk of damaging the original, paper copy.

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While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

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